Tag: Revision

The Life of Jesus – Revision Resource

The Life of Jesus – Revision Resource

This is a great website that talks you through all the things you need to know about Jesus.

In the National 5 and Higher Exam – you will need to know Who Jesus was, Beliefs about him, his teachings, what impact he had as well as basic information about his life.

You may be asked to reflect on who he was in relation to God. Also you should be able to describe a few parables in detail.

http://request.org.uk/jesus/introduction-to-jesus/

This Website  – REQuest is really easy to use and helpful at guiding you through Jesus’ life.

Why not use it to answer some of these questions.

  1. Create a timeline of key events in Jesus’ life.
  2. What is the significance of the Incarnation (Birth of Jesus) to Christians (4)
  3. What are Christian Beliefs about Jesus? (4)
  4. Explain what is meant by the Holy Trinity. (4)
  5. Jesus is often referred to as the Messiah – What does this mean? (4)
  6. Jesus taught people how to live by using parables.
    1. Summarise 2 parables and their meanings.
    2. Explain how Jesus used Parables to teach people how to live their lives (4)
  7. Summarise the Easter Story. (4)
  8. How do Christians celebrate this? (4)

The website also has lots of other information for revision. I will pinpoint some other parts.

National 5 Revision Guides and Questions

National 5 Revision Guides and Questions

Hello National 5s

Below are the revision guides for your three units to complete in the exam.

I will add more and more revision guides to this website for the topics that you need to know about for the exam.

Remember to use this website to help or come along to B12 after school for help.

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Use these Revision Questions to help test your knowledge of the above content. There are revision guides on this page for most of the topics if you need extra help.

National 5- Revision Questions

 

National 5: Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks) Model Answer

National 5: Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks) Model Answer

Below is a model answer for a National 5 8 Marker Evaluation Question.

Read more about how to answer these here. 

Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks)

Some people would argue that it is reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe. A theist would say that god created the universe and would use the Cosmological arguments to support this. The cosmological argument is based on the idea that everything that exists must have a cause, the universe exists and theist would say that its cause is God. This links with the Big Bang Theory, which Scientists would agree was the beginning of the Universe. For many because the Big Bang was the start of time, space and matter it doesn’t need a cause. However theists would say that this cause is God. 

An atheist would disagree saying that God does not exist. They would agree that the Big Bang Theory was the start of the universe and everything within it. However they would argue that the Cosmological Argument does not prove that God Exists just that there is no explanation yet as to how the Big Bang began and for many this is irrelevant as the Big Bang was the beginning of everything. 

Therefore it can be reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the Universe but it would require Faith and belief in god in addition to the scientific evidence and reason. 

 

 

Is it Reasonable to Believe that God Created the Universe? Higher Model Answer

Is it Reasonable to Believe that God Created the Universe? Higher Model Answer

Is it reasonable to believe that God Created the Universe? (20 Marks)

Below is a model answer of the above question. I have added in some links to help with additional reading.

This is a question that has been widely debated for years and as scientific advances happen, fresh debates also happen. In order for something to be reasonable, it must have evidence to back up the claim. When looking at the Existence of God, many would look to evidence to support their argument. However Religious people, such as Christians would also say that belief in something also requires Faith. There are different types of truth, which depend on faith. (Read more about this here. )

Christians fundamental belief is that God must exist because the Universe exists and he is the Creator of everything. For them, God reveals himself in different ways. Sometimes this may be directly communicating with people – for example giving the Ten Commandments to Moses. Those who believe Jesus was an incarnation of God, also believe that this was God revealing himself to humanity. There are many different types of revalation that God has used to show himself  to humanity. Christians believe that this therefore is proof that God exists and created the Universe because there is evidence of him in the Bible, History and in the world around us.

Critics of this argument would say that because the word exists and there are instances of God revealing himself do not actually prove God exists or that he created the Universe. There are questions raised about the physical appearance of God so much in the times of the Old Testament but not anymore. Scientists would argue that the Bible cannot be used as a source of Scientific knowledge as it is full of inaccuracies and contradictions. It was written by humans about their understandings of God. Scientists would argue that therefore it is not a divine revelation, instead interpretations of a divine revelation. What one person experiences is not valid scientific evidence because it is a personal experience that cannot be verified. This is where the argument of the difference between faith and reason comes in. God is so powerful and mysterious that he is beyond human comprehension, therefore depending on your own faith and reason it could be reasonable to believe that God created the universe.

The Christian creation story of Genesis 1 can be used to support beliefs in God. This is the story that God created the world in 6 days and rested on the 7th. This can be interpreted in different ways. Creationist or Literal Christians believe that this is true in every way. They believe that the Bible is God’s word and so we must accept everything that is in it as the truth. Therefore for literal there is no debate when asked if God exists. God is Omnipotent and can do anything. Some Christians would say that this literal view is not compatible with some scientific evidence and therefore would see the creation story as being symbolic. They still believe that God created the world but not in the 7 24 hour time periods that are described in the Bible. By interpreting the source in this way Liberal Christians can look at scientific evidence and interpret the source with other developments that humans have found to be true. Therefore many would argue that the Genesis story can either prove or at least support the belief in a God as a creator.

The Cosmological Argument is an argument first put forward by Thomas Aquinas. The argument suggests that everything that exists must exist because it was caused by something else. Everything in the universe must have a cause. There must have been a first cause to cause everything. This cause must have been an uncaused cause to start everything off. The only thing that is eternal and powerful enough is God. Therefore God must be the first cause and God must exist. This gives a philosophical reason for the existence of God and gives reason to the argument that God exists. Christians use this argument to support their belief that God created the universe.

There are flaws with the Cosmological argument as an explanation for how the Universe began. For example, the premise of the argument that everything must have a cause does not include God. For many there is the argument that if God does not need a cause why does the universe? This argument also only links to the conclusion that there must be a uncaused cause, this doesn’t necessarily mean it is God. Scientists would use the Big Bang Theory to explain how the Universe began. The Big Bang was the start of the Universe: Matter, Space and Time. There was nothing before it. Quantum Physicists suggest that matter can appear and disappear spontaneously and does not require a cause. There are many different pieces of evidence that Scientists use to back up the theory of the Big Bang. For example theory proposed by Hubble and Einstein explain that there must be a limitation to the energy in the Universe this can be seen in the Red Shift, which shows the Universe is expanding. Although there is a lot of scientific evidence that supports the Big Bang there is no conclusive explanation for why it happened. For many Christians and other religious groups this cause has to be God, as to them it is the only logical explanation. Some Creationist Christians may argue against the Big Bang Theory and instead would only accept the word of the Bible, and the 7 day creation story.

The Teleological Argument is another argument used to support the argument about the existence of God. First proposed by William Paley, the argument suggests that the world is so perfect that it must have been designed. For example the Earth is the right distance away from the sun for life to survive. There are also examples within the complexities of nature, for many the only logical answer to how this could be would be the existence of a God. However there are critics of this argument such as Immanuel Kant, he argues that the structure and order on Earth is imagined. We want to see a perfect world so that is what we see. Hume also critiques this argument saying that the order of the world does not prove a god created it. It could be a group of gods or perhaps something other than God. An Argument is merely a theory and is not proof that something exists. This theory of a perfect world also does not fit in with the idea of evolution, which has been scientifically been proven by scientists such as Darwin. Many would however argue that Evolution was all part of God’s overall plan. As with most arguments about God, it is up to personal interpretation and faith. There is enough evidence to support either side of the argument and it could be proven either way. It is up to an individuals faith in God whether or not he exists and created the Universe.

To conclude, many would argue that it is indeed reasonable to believe that God created the Universe as belief in God requires an element of Faith along with reason. The idea of God can work with scientific theories such as that of The Big Bang Theory. For others the revelation of God through his creation and holy word is enough evidence. It does require an element of faith and that is down to personal interpretation.

 

What to Expect in the National 5 RMPS Exam.

What to Expect in the National 5 RMPS Exam.

The Exam

The National 5 Exam is made up of three parts.

World Religion

Explaining and commenting on the meaning and context of religious beliefs, practices and sources.

Morality and Belief

Presenting detailed and reasoned views about contemporary moral question

Religious and Philosophical Questions

Analysing religious and philosophical questions and responses.

It lasts 90 minutes, so roughly 30 minutes per section. Within each section there are different topics, you need to make sure you answer only the topic you have studied.

One Religion
One Moral Issue
One Philosophical Question

The Skills

Each section will have 3-4 questions, the whole section will be worth 20 marks.

There are two main skills you will need in your exam, alongside basic description questions.

Analysing

Analysis is a pivotal skill in National 5. The focus in analysis is on breaking down factual information. Analysis can follow knowledge and understanding and very often excellent knowledge and understanding is, in fact, analysis. Similarly, analysis often precedes evaluation. Analysis includes the following:

    •   making connections
    •   explaining the background
    •   predicting consequences
    •   identifying implications
    •  interpreting sources and viewpoints

      Analyse

Evaluating

There will be an 8 marker question in each section, this will be an Evaluation question.

For some time now, ‘evaluating’ has been misunderstood as simply listing two sides of an argument. The skill demands much more than this and expects candidates to discuss the quality of any positions taken. This involves:

    •   making a supported judgement on an issue
    •   making a supported measurement of the effects, impact or significance of an issue
    •   presenting a case for or against a position
    •   commenting on the quality of positions taken on issues

Evaluate

Read more about How to answer 8 Marker Questions here. 
The Noble Eightfold Path

The Noble Eightfold Path

The Noble Eightfold Path consists of eight ways of thinking, speaking and behaving that the Buddha said people should follow if they want to reach Nirvana, the end of suffering.

Some would argue that it may be too difficult to follow. See below at each of the steps and challenges it may present.

2cfeb6f5e9b4069b48ee1005fc2ea22bRIGHT UNDERSTANDING

Right Understanding understands the teachings on karma and rebirth, the Three Universal Truths, the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. However, this is not just an intellectual understanding. Rather it is where you actually feel those things to be true in your heart and they influence the way you see and do things at a day-to-day level. This could prove difficult for some.

RIGHT INTENTION

Before we do anything we usually think about it; first we develop the INTENTION to do something then we do it. Sometimes our intention is a selfish one, where we decide to do things just for the sake of our own happiness. Sometimes we even do things with the negative intention of harming others.

Right Intention means doing things for the right reasons. Instead of thinking about doing things for him or herself, a Buddhist thinks about doing things for others. Instead of thinking about how they can harm others, Buddhists think about how they can help others. Basically, Right Intention is stopping doing things for bad reasons and instead doing them for good ones.

RIGHT SPEECH

Right Speech means (1) not lying, (2) not swearing, (3) not gossiping and (4) not saying things that cause other people to fall out. A Buddhist always tries to do the opposite of these things: he or she tries to tell the truth, to speak pleasantly and about meaningful subjects. Finally, he tries to speak in ways that cause harmony between people. This may be hard to follow through for many at all times.

RIGHT ACTION

Right Action means (1) not killing or injuring any living being, (2) not stealing, and (3) not committing sexual misconduct (simply put, this means not being unfaithful to your partner).

 

RIGHT LIVELIHOOD

A Buddhist must never make their living in a way that is harmful to others. This means that he or she can never work selling (1) weapons, (2) meat, (3) slaves,
(4) harmful drugs or (5) poisons. A Buddhist could be a chemist because the drugs he sold would not harm people. He could not own a pub though!

Some Buddhist’s may have difficulty working in the cigarette or alcohol industry or in the manufacturing of weapons. Also jobs that exploit animals or damage the environment should be avoided.

RIGHT EFFORT

Right Effort means making an effort to abandon negative ways of thinking such as proud, angry, or jealous thoughts and instead making an effort to develop positive ways of thinking such as humble, generous or compassionate thoughts.

RIGHT MINDFULNESS

To be mindful of something means to remember it. We all have mindfulness but it is usually mindfulness of something meaningless like the pop song we can’t stop singing or the girl or boy we can’t stop thinking about. Buddhists learn to be mindful of a calm and peaceful state of mind so that when something that causes a strong sense of ‘self’ suddenly appears to the mind, be it a thought, a feeling, a sensation, or an object, they remember or are ‘mindful’ of that calm and peaceful state of mind.

RIGHT CONCENTRATION

Right Concentration is the ability to keep the mind totally concentrated on a calm, peaceful state without becoming distracted. It is very similar to Right Mindfulness, indeed the two work together very closely. While Right Concentration remains focussed on the calm and peaceful state, Right Mindfulness notices when the mind starts to get distracted and pulls it back to the object of concentration. By keeping the mind concentrated through Right Concentration, and preventing distraction from arising by practising Right Mindfulness, a Buddhist gradually dissolves their mind into deeper and deeper states of meditation until eventually they reach Nirvana. Here, because they have gone beyond the sense of ‘self’, they achieve the End of Suffering, (the Third Noble Truth).

eightfold-path-folding-reference-card

What are the benefits and difficulties when following the Eightfold Path?

The benefits of following the Eightfold Path are:

  • Helps overcome suffering.
  • Gives guidelines on how to live free from craving
  • Helps to overcome attachment and gain good Karma
  • Helps to free ones self from samsara
  • It brings calm and peace to a person and helps gain wisdom
  • Creates a freer and more tolerant society

Some difficulties of trying to follow the Eightfold path are

  • It is hard to keep to the path. Responsibilities of work and family take up time
  • Pressure of work and the time work takes, can keep people from following the path.
  • Other attachments and cravings which we are exposed to in the modern world hinder our progress.
  • Sometimes the path might not seem realistic in the busy modern life.
  • Some Buddhists believe that you have to withdraw to a monastry to progress along the path quicker.
Embryo Research

Embryo Research

In your Morality and Medicine topic you may be asked about Embryo Research and viewpoints related to it. Here are some resources you can use to help you revise for this section.

What is Embryo Research?

http://www.rsrevision.com/Alevel/ethics/embryology/definitions.htm

Humanist (non-religious) response to Embryo Research

http://www.humanismforschools.org.uk/pdfs/embryo%20research.pdf

Buddhist Response to Embryo Research

http://www.clear-vision.org/Schools/Students/Ages-17-18/life-and-death/embryo-research.aspx

 

 

How do Non- Religious people make decisions?

How do Non- Religious people make decisions?

There is no one singular answer to this question. People make decisions in a variety of different ways, people may not even know the process that they go through to make decisions. Some religious people may look to their own holy books or teachings for guidance. But what about non religious people? Where do they go for guidance?

Humanism

This is a non religious group of people, who do not believe in any god, life after death or religion. They believe life is to be lived and there is no further purpose. This website here explains a little more about their beliefs and how they come to making decisions. http://understandinghumanism.org.uk/uhtheme/ethics/?age=14

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Utilitarianism

Utilitarian is a way of thinking based on doing the best to make the most people happy. There are different types of Utilitarians and this video explains how Utilitarians make decisions.

 

If in an exam you are asked about how non- religious people make decisions. These are two examples you can use.

Revision Wall

Revision Wall

I am not even a little bit ashamed to admit how excited I am about my Revision Wall. Complete with Fairy Lights.

On it I have some revision posters, model answers and revision guides. I also in a drawer underneath I have marking schemes of past paper questions to help pupils with creating revision mind maps and notes.

Here’s the posters below, feel free to use.

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