Inspirational Characters and People

Inspirational Characters and People

Our S2 Pupils are currently completing Inspiring Purpose and looking at inspiring people and characters. They need to chose a character that inspires them and a inspirational person.

To help them along here are a few lists of inspiring people.

Who would you add to the list?

34 Empowering Female Characters Guaranteed To Inspire You

http://www.biographyonline.net/people/inspirational.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/famouspeople/

https://www.powtoon.com/blog/23-most-inspiring-people-alive/

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Understanding Humanism Resources

Understanding Humanism Resources

 

This is a great website created by the Humanist Society of Scotland to understand Humanist views on things.

https://www.humanism.scot/what-we-do/education/education-resources/

It includes

What is Humanism?

PDF

Bioethics

PDF

The Origin of Religion

PDF

Humanist Responses to Various Moral Issues –

Great for assignments or assessments where you need a non religious viewpoint!

https://www.humanism.scot/what-we-do/previous-campaigns/the-h-factor/

Responses to Origins of the Universe and Life

PDF

This is a good website to get viewpoints from to add into any pieces of work in RME. For teachers there are examples of lesson plans etc!

 

Islam – Beliefs in God

Islam – Beliefs in God

This is a summary of what Muslims believe about God. The Arabic word for God is Allah, that is what many Muslims call him as most of islamic texts and words are written in Arabic.

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Tawhid

Muslims believe in Tawhid – this is the belief that there is one supreme god. Muslims are Monotheistic, this means they only have one god. They believe that God is eternal, he has always existed and always will. Allah has no gender, no partners and no equals. His nature is beyond our human understanding.

Importance of Tawhid

Tawhid is very important to Muslims. Allah should always be the forefront of Muslims minds. It is the first part of the Shahadah. This is the first thing whispered into a baby’s ear and should be the last thing a dying muslim says. It should also be the first and last thing  Muslim says each and everyday. This highlights that Allah is the only one god. He has complete creative power.

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Creator

Allah is the creator of the Universe and has the power to do anything and everything Muslims believe he is all loving and all knowing. Although Allah has created the whole world and is beyond the universe. he is close at hand. He is immanent. This is the belief that he is close at hand, he is here with us. He knows our unspoken thoughts, he is even closer to us than us than our own heartbeats.

Shirk

Shirk is seen as the one unforgivable sin in Islam. It means associating other beings with Allah. It is idolatry. If your try to compare Allah to anything in creation, or suggest they have the same abilities , this would be shirk.

poster-shirk

 

Introduction to Islam

Introduction to Islam

Islam is the fastest growing religion today. One in five people in the world are Muslim. That’s over a billion people!

This post is all about an Introduction to Islam. I recommend starting with this video!

Muslims are found throughout the world. Contrary to common belief, most Muslims are not Arab. In fact, only 20% are from Arab countries. The largest communities are in Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh and India.

There are many misconceptions about Islam and stereotypes surrounding the religion. It is as important as ever to study Islam in the modern day especially with recent current affairs.

The 7 Core Beliefs

There are seven core beliefs that all Muslims believe in. These are:

  1. Belief in Allah as the one and only God
  2. Belief in angels
  3. Belief in the Revealed Book of God
  4. Belief in Allah’s prophets
  5. Belief in the Day of Judgement
  6. Belief in Allah having a record of our actions
  7. Belief in an afterlife

There will be a series of posts all about Islam as the class works through their National Coursework.

Recommended Further Reading

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/islam/

What do I need to do in my RMPS Assignment?

What do I need to do in my RMPS Assignment?

RMPS Assignment.pngThe write-ups for RMPS N5 and Higher Assignments are coming up. So below is a guide to help you complete your assignment and achieve a great result.

Use the guides, the booklet and this rmps-assignment-planner to help you

National 5

The Task

 

The purpose of this assignment is to demonstrate your ability to apply your skills and knowledge and understanding to research a religious, moral or philosophical issue of your choice. This may be related to areas you have studied in class if you wish, but you are free to research any relevant topic or issue. For help with topics see here. 

The assignment is worth 20 marks. The marks contribute 25% of the overall marks for the Course assessment. The Course will be graded A–D. This means that it can have a massive impact on your final grade.

The assessment for the assignment will be in the form of a report of your research and findings. You must complete this report within one hour.

The Resource Sheet

You will have the RMPS Resource Sheet which you can refer to as you produce a report of your findings. This will help you produce your report of your assignment. You must use only one side of this single sheet and be no more than 200 words.

The Resource Sheet will not be marked; you will only be awarded marks for what you include in your report. You must not use it to pre-write your report, however it is fine to copy quotations in full. No marks will be awarded for directly copying extended pieces of text/narrative from the Resource Sheet.

What are we marked on?

A. Identify an appropriate religious, moral or philosophical issue

How you can do this

Identify a religious, moral or philosophical issue. Your issue can be religious or moral or philosophical or any combination of these. Your issue should allow you to:

¨     find relevant factual information and relevant viewpoints

¨     comment on the significance or impact of the issue

¨     come to a conclusion which you can support with reasons

B. Comment on the significance or impact of the issue

How you can do this

Your comment should focus on the significance or impact of the religious, moral or philosophical issue you have been studying.

This means you need to show you understand the issue or topic you have chosen. You are showing the marker you know that the issue is important. Perhaps this would be referring to current debate, recent news articles, how important the issue is. Obviously this would depend completely on your chosen topic as to what would be appropriate to include.

C. Use information from different sources

How you can do this

You will need to:

¨     collect information which will help you come to a conclusion on the issue

¨     find out about facts and viewpoints

¨     take a note of where you found this information

Collecting information

You should collect evidence relevant to the issue, from a range of sources. This may include, for example:

¨     websites/blogs

¨     newspapers/magazines (print or electronic)

¨     books

¨     religious texts

¨     visits or fieldtrips

¨     television/video

¨     radio/podcasts

¨     textbooks

¨     interviews/questionnaires

¨     artefacts

¨     iconography

Taking a note of the sources you have used

When presenting evidence from sources, you should say where the information comes from.

It is useful to reference the sources you have used. You can quote directly or put it in your own words. For example:

1 Corinthians 13 states that….

Or

In The Blind Watchmaker Dawkins argues that….

Or

The Buddhist Wheel of Life shows….

Or

The BBC Religion and Ethics website states that…. (full URL for websites are not required)

It is important to think about the reliability and appropriateness of the sources you use.

See here for some research ideas

D. Use knowledge and understanding to explain and analyse aspects of the issue

How you can do this

Use accurate knowledge to explain key aspects of the issue. Explaining and analysing the issue could require you to make links between factors or different aspects of the issue, and show that you have understood how these different factors affect each other, for example:

¨     People who believe in a literal interpretation of religious creation stories will reject scientific accounts of the origin of the universe. This may lead them to mistrust science in general, which in turn may affect…

¨     Religious people may agree with non-religious people that the issue of mankind’s responsibility for the environment is a moral issue, because they believe that…

E. Present a conclusion about the issue

F. Support the conclusion with reasons

How you can do this

Present a conclusion which is supported with valid reasons.

Your conclusion may be presented at any point in your writing, for example, as you present your evidence or at the end.

Concluding that you are unsure is fine, providing you can support your view with clear reasons.

Higher

This assignment is worth 30 marks out of a total of 90 marks for the Course. The marks contribute approximately 33% of the overall marks for the Course assessment. The Course will be graded A–D. This therefore can have a massive impact on your final grade! 

As with the N5 Assignment you need to choose an appropriate issue and topic. Complete research on it and analyse and evaluate the debate surrounding the topic. There are 3 things that you will be marked on.

 

 

A  Knowledge and Understanding (12 marks)

Researching the issue

You should use a range of sources of information, to which you should refer to in your assignment. (See above for examples of the different types of research you could complete)

Demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the issue

You should use your knowledge and understanding to support your response to the issue.

This is where you show off what you have learned about the topic.

B   Analysis (10 marks)

Analysing the issue

Analysis involved identifying parts, the relationship between them, and their relationships with the whole. It can also involve drawing out and relating implications.

Analyse

Synthesising information in a structured manner

You should draw together a range of information in response to the issue. Bring together your arguments and support draw links between your different pieces of information.

Explaining the significance or impact of the issue

You should explain the significance or impact of the issue. Explain why it is such an important topic or issue.

C   Evaluation (8 marks)

Evaluate

Evaluating different viewpoints on the issue

You should evaluate different viewpoints on the issue. Evaluation involves making reasoned judgements.

Presenting a detailed explanation of supporting information and potential challenges/counter-arguments

You should comment on arguments, challenges and/or counter-arguments in terms of, for example: validity, quality, strengths, weaknesses, consistency, etc.

Presenting a reasoned and well-structured conclusion on the issue

You should draw and present a reasoned conclusion on the issue. Your conclusion should include an overall judgement about the issue.

Use the support on this website and come on a Tuesday after school to get extra help!

GOOD LUCK!

 

Character Education – Inspiring Purpose – What is Character?

Character Education – Inspiring Purpose – What is Character?

I love this time of year!

Starting the Inspiring Purpose project with S2s. Formerly Inspire Aspire, this is a project that looks at developing pupils character, their inspirations and ambition. It is a project run all across the Commonwealth, if you haven’t heard of it you can read more about it here! 

I will document our progress throughout the process and share some of our entries. Firstly we started thinking about our own character and what is character?  This 8 Minute video is great for that!

Next the Pupils wrote about the type of person they aspire to be. I have created a Slideshow of some of their answers! They are utterly brilliant!

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We then took the ‘periodic table of characters strengths’ and decided on what ones are the most important. There was a great discussion in some classes about whether Honesty is the best policy and what is the difference between being a ‘snake’ and not being a bystander. We talked about this poem here.

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Over the next few weeks the pupils at Musselburgh Grammar School are going to be taking part in this project and forming their own action plan for the future!

National 5: Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks) Model Answer

National 5: Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks) Model Answer

Below is a model answer for a National 5 8 Marker Evaluation Question.

Read more about how to answer these here. 

Is it reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe? (8 marks)

Some people would argue that it is reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the universe. A theist would say that god created the universe and would use the Cosmological arguments to support this. The cosmological argument is based on the idea that everything that exists must have a cause, the universe exists and theist would say that its cause is God. This links with the Big Bang Theory, which Scientists would agree was the beginning of the Universe. For many because the Big Bang was the start of time, space and matter it doesn’t need a cause. However theists would say that this cause is God. 

An atheist would disagree saying that God does not exist. They would agree that the Big Bang Theory was the start of the universe and everything within it. However they would argue that the Cosmological Argument does not prove that God Exists just that there is no explanation yet as to how the Big Bang began and for many this is irrelevant as the Big Bang was the beginning of everything. 

Therefore it can be reasonable to believe that God is the uncaused cause of the Universe but it would require Faith and belief in god in addition to the scientific evidence and reason. 

 

 

Is it Reasonable to Believe that God Created the Universe? Higher Model Answer

Is it Reasonable to Believe that God Created the Universe? Higher Model Answer

Is it reasonable to believe that God Created the Universe? (20 Marks)

Below is a model answer of the above question. I have added in some links to help with additional reading.

This is a question that has been widely debated for years and as scientific advances happen, fresh debates also happen. In order for something to be reasonable, it must have evidence to back up the claim. When looking at the Existence of God, many would look to evidence to support their argument. However Religious people, such as Christians would also say that belief in something also requires Faith. There are different types of truth, which depend on faith. (Read more about this here. )

Christians fundamental belief is that God must exist because the Universe exists and he is the Creator of everything. For them, God reveals himself in different ways. Sometimes this may be directly communicating with people – for example giving the Ten Commandments to Moses. Those who believe Jesus was an incarnation of God, also believe that this was God revealing himself to humanity. There are many different types of revalation that God has used to show himself  to humanity. Christians believe that this therefore is proof that God exists and created the Universe because there is evidence of him in the Bible, History and in the world around us.

Critics of this argument would say that because the word exists and there are instances of God revealing himself do not actually prove God exists or that he created the Universe. There are questions raised about the physical appearance of God so much in the times of the Old Testament but not anymore. Scientists would argue that the Bible cannot be used as a source of Scientific knowledge as it is full of inaccuracies and contradictions. It was written by humans about their understandings of God. Scientists would argue that therefore it is not a divine revelation, instead interpretations of a divine revelation. What one person experiences is not valid scientific evidence because it is a personal experience that cannot be verified. This is where the argument of the difference between faith and reason comes in. God is so powerful and mysterious that he is beyond human comprehension, therefore depending on your own faith and reason it could be reasonable to believe that God created the universe.

The Christian creation story of Genesis 1 can be used to support beliefs in God. This is the story that God created the world in 6 days and rested on the 7th. This can be interpreted in different ways. Creationist or Literal Christians believe that this is true in every way. They believe that the Bible is God’s word and so we must accept everything that is in it as the truth. Therefore for literal there is no debate when asked if God exists. God is Omnipotent and can do anything. Some Christians would say that this literal view is not compatible with some scientific evidence and therefore would see the creation story as being symbolic. They still believe that God created the world but not in the 7 24 hour time periods that are described in the Bible. By interpreting the source in this way Liberal Christians can look at scientific evidence and interpret the source with other developments that humans have found to be true. Therefore many would argue that the Genesis story can either prove or at least support the belief in a God as a creator.

The Cosmological Argument is an argument first put forward by Thomas Aquinas. The argument suggests that everything that exists must exist because it was caused by something else. Everything in the universe must have a cause. There must have been a first cause to cause everything. This cause must have been an uncaused cause to start everything off. The only thing that is eternal and powerful enough is God. Therefore God must be the first cause and God must exist. This gives a philosophical reason for the existence of God and gives reason to the argument that God exists. Christians use this argument to support their belief that God created the universe.

There are flaws with the Cosmological argument as an explanation for how the Universe began. For example, the premise of the argument that everything must have a cause does not include God. For many there is the argument that if God does not need a cause why does the universe? This argument also only links to the conclusion that there must be a uncaused cause, this doesn’t necessarily mean it is God. Scientists would use the Big Bang Theory to explain how the Universe began. The Big Bang was the start of the Universe: Matter, Space and Time. There was nothing before it. Quantum Physicists suggest that matter can appear and disappear spontaneously and does not require a cause. There are many different pieces of evidence that Scientists use to back up the theory of the Big Bang. For example theory proposed by Hubble and Einstein explain that there must be a limitation to the energy in the Universe this can be seen in the Red Shift, which shows the Universe is expanding. Although there is a lot of scientific evidence that supports the Big Bang there is no conclusive explanation for why it happened. For many Christians and other religious groups this cause has to be God, as to them it is the only logical explanation. Some Creationist Christians may argue against the Big Bang Theory and instead would only accept the word of the Bible, and the 7 day creation story.

The Teleological Argument is another argument used to support the argument about the existence of God. First proposed by William Paley, the argument suggests that the world is so perfect that it must have been designed. For example the Earth is the right distance away from the sun for life to survive. There are also examples within the complexities of nature, for many the only logical answer to how this could be would be the existence of a God. However there are critics of this argument such as Immanuel Kant, he argues that the structure and order on Earth is imagined. We want to see a perfect world so that is what we see. Hume also critiques this argument saying that the order of the world does not prove a god created it. It could be a group of gods or perhaps something other than God. An Argument is merely a theory and is not proof that something exists. This theory of a perfect world also does not fit in with the idea of evolution, which has been scientifically been proven by scientists such as Darwin. Many would however argue that Evolution was all part of God’s overall plan. As with most arguments about God, it is up to personal interpretation and faith. There is enough evidence to support either side of the argument and it could be proven either way. It is up to an individuals faith in God whether or not he exists and created the Universe.

To conclude, many would argue that it is indeed reasonable to believe that God created the Universe as belief in God requires an element of Faith along with reason. The idea of God can work with scientific theories such as that of The Big Bang Theory. For others the revelation of God through his creation and holy word is enough evidence. It does require an element of faith and that is down to personal interpretation.

 

What to Expect in the National 5 RMPS Exam.

What to Expect in the National 5 RMPS Exam.

The Exam

The National 5 Exam is made up of three parts.

World Religion

Explaining and commenting on the meaning and context of religious beliefs, practices and sources.

Morality and Belief

Presenting detailed and reasoned views about contemporary moral question

Religious and Philosophical Questions

Analysing religious and philosophical questions and responses.

It lasts 90 minutes, so roughly 30 minutes per section. Within each section there are different topics, you need to make sure you answer only the topic you have studied.

One Religion
One Moral Issue
One Philosophical Question

The Skills

Each section will have 3-4 questions, the whole section will be worth 20 marks.

There are two main skills you will need in your exam, alongside basic description questions.

Analysing

Analysis is a pivotal skill in National 5. The focus in analysis is on breaking down factual information. Analysis can follow knowledge and understanding and very often excellent knowledge and understanding is, in fact, analysis. Similarly, analysis often precedes evaluation. Analysis includes the following:

    •   making connections
    •   explaining the background
    •   predicting consequences
    •   identifying implications
    •  interpreting sources and viewpoints

      Analyse

Evaluating

There will be an 8 marker question in each section, this will be an Evaluation question.

For some time now, ‘evaluating’ has been misunderstood as simply listing two sides of an argument. The skill demands much more than this and expects candidates to discuss the quality of any positions taken. This involves:

    •   making a supported judgement on an issue
    •   making a supported measurement of the effects, impact or significance of an issue
    •   presenting a case for or against a position
    •   commenting on the quality of positions taken on issues

Evaluate

Read more about How to answer 8 Marker Questions here.