Author: learningrmps

The Big Bang Theory Explained

The Big Bang Theory is a term for a theory that is centuries old although is on record as being term the ‘Big Bang Theory’ by Fred Hoyle in the 1920s. There are many different parts to the Big Bang Theories and some disagreements within the scientific community as to the cause and effect of the Big Bang but it is widely agreed that:

  1. The Universe had a definite beginning.
  2. The Universe continues to expand and cool down.
  3. The Universe isn’t reliant on something or some being for it’s existence.

There is no universal agreement on what caused the Big Bang to begin or what will happen to the universe eventually.

Universe 03 Concept Isometric

Below is a quick guide to the Big Bang (Excuse me if anything is inaccurate, feel free to send any corrections to me!)

Stephen Hawking’s Into the Universe

In class, we have watched Stephen Hawking’s Universe in class to help us understand the Theory. From the video we have learned.

We have discovered more about the universe in the last 100 years than in the past 200,000 years. Everything in the Universe has been made by stars.

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The Red Shift

We know that the Big Bang Happened and the Galaxies are moving away from us because of Red Shift. This is when Galaxies appear Red due to the fact that they are moving away from us. This is explained in this BBC Guide. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/origins/redshiftrev1.shtml

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The Big Bang

The Big Bang started at a single point when the universe burst into existence. Before this it was complete darkness as light did not exist neither did space. When the universe began there was an ultra hot fog of energy.

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Within a trillionth of a second the universe stretched from the size of an atom to and orange and began cooling down. Within 100 seconds the universe was the size of our solar system. As the universe was cooling down, matter and anti matter were created. When matter and anti matter collide they destroy each other. This was happening constantly and only 1 in 1 billion matter particles survived. It is from these particles that everything was formed.

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“We are made of the smoke of the Big Bang”

The radiation from the Big Bang can still be seen and heard on earth. For example in television and radio waves.

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Gravity

Gravity is the cause of everything. The discovery of gravity is attributed to Sir Isaac Newton. Gravity is the pulling of everything together. Because some matter was denser and less effective when pulled by gravity it meant that there were imperfections in the universe. These imperfections were what created the universe.

gravity-definition-kids-physical-science

Hydrogen gas was the first element created. It is extremely powerful and it is what gives stars their power and energy. If hydrogen is compacted down it will heat up and cause nuclear fusion. This process is what caused helium to be created. This process is what took place in order to create more elements. This is a long process.

Black Holes

Gravity can also be dangerous and cause black holes. A black hole is created when a massive star begins to dies and becomes unstable. It shrinks and gets denser and denser until the core starts collapsing in on itself. Black Holes give off radiation and this is what galaxies rotate around.

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How were planets formed?

Our solar system is about 6 billion years old. A Star exploded and we can see evidence of this in the nebula in the solar system. Nebula is a thick fog full of different elements. Gravity pulls these elements together. The pressure of the hydrogen gas led to an explosion and a formation of a new star (our sun). This blast gave off a radioactive dust that pushed any excess dust. From these elements and dust planets began to form.

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Did this all happen by accident?

All questions about the Big Bang ultimately lead to questions on whether this was a ‘perfect accident’. Christian Scientists who believe that the Universe was created by God. They use the examples of

  •  The earth being the exact positions away from the Sun that it is not too hot or too cold.
  • All the elements required for life are present on the earth.
  • The imbalance or imperfection that was required for life to begin was a 1 in a billion chance.

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Stephen Hawking refuted this explaining that for the size of the universe and the 1 in a billion chance it is inevitable that at least of the billions of planets would have life on them.

Further Reading

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/universe/questions_and_ideas/big_bang

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The Four Sights and Going Forth – Buddhism

The Four Sights and Going Forth – Buddhism

The Four Sights are the 4 things that Siddhartha Gautama saw for the first time when he left the palace after living a sheltered life. When thinking about the four sights you need to try to think of it from the perspective of never seeing these things before and how your eyes would be opened to the truth.

My S3’s recently completed a task where they created eye’s that explained the sight and the significance of it inside. The Eye being opened symbolised the Truth being revealed. Here are some of their ideas.

seeng the old

First Sight – An Old Man

The first thing that Siddhartha saw was an Old Man – weak and frail. This is a major revelation as Siddartha would have come to the realisation that you are not young, fit and healthy forever. It is something that no one can escape.

Suffering is caused by old age because your body becomes weaker and sore and daily tasks may become hard due to this.

It is significant because it told Siddhartha that one day he too will become old and not live forever and be able to do everything he wants to do.

Second Sight – A Sick Man

The second sight was a sick man. After seeing the old man this would also be a shock as Siddhārtha had been sheltered from this and had never come across the concept of people getting sick, ill, helpless and even so ill they die.

Suffering is caused by the person being sick and not able to function. Suffering is also caused but the family worrying about this person.

This is significant because it shows that illness can affect everyone no matter what your circumstances are.

Another pupil put it:

sickness is inevitable and abnormal for someone who had never seen it. To see someone sick would be extremely alarming and confusing as they were unaware the body could do this.

Sickness is still a huge problem in society whether it is something as unforgiving as cancer or something as small as a cold it still affects us. It can happen to anyone, of any age, including Siddhārtha.

Third Sight – A Corpse

The third thing that Siddhartha saw was a corpse on a funeral pyre. This would have been a shock as this would be an awakening that life is not a continuous event. Think about it when people get a diagnosis of only a few months to live they change the way they live their lives some may write a Bucket List of things that they want to achieve before death. It changes their perspective.

“Death also affects the family of the loved one. If Siddhārtha never knew his family were going to die he may take them for granted. Whereas if he knew his family would die he would protect them and cherish the time he had with them.”

Fourth Sight – A Holy Man

After the first three Sights, Prince Siddhartha realises he has been duped throughout his life. He has been surrounded by luxury, shielded from suffering and true reality by his father.  It is the fourth Sight which first awakens him to other possibilities and an escape from suffering. He sees a wandering holy man, a Sadhu, who appears happy in the midst of the suffering.

sadhu
A Sadhu is a wandering holy man, a kind of new age traveller of his times. This person had left home, renounced all the usual conventions and responsibilities, to live the homeless life on the road, to seek the Truth. This was called “Going Forth”.

 

“The wise man is at peace with the world even though he has no possessions. This shows Siddhartha that he does not need material things to be happy. Siddhārtha feels betrayed by his family and so feels he must go find the truth.”

 

Did Siddhārtha really never experience these things?

It is highly unlikely that Siddhartha went through his whole life not experiencing any of these four sights. His teachings often take the form of stories with deeper meanings behind them and it is thought that this is such a story. Siddhartha is getting the point across as if you had never witnessed these four sights before in order to show the impact they have had on his life. He is emphasising the sheltered life he has lived.

Siddhartha returned to the palace. He went to see his father and asked, “Why have you lied about the existence of suffering, sickness, poverty, old age and death. Suddhodana said that if he had lied it was because he loved his son. But Siddhartha said that his father’s love “had become a prison, how can I stay here when there is so much suffering in the world, I have to do something about it”.

Siddhartha visited his wife and son as they slept to say good-bye. He could not wake them, for if he did, his love would not allow him to go. His heart was aching but he realised he had to leave them. The whole palace had fallen into a deep sleep, and a mysterious mist had descended. Only the great elephants were awake, and Siddhartha and Channa.

What does it mean by Going Forth?

He had reached the point where the conventions, the pattern of life that had been laid out for him was stifling. So he had to get out. In the story, Siddhartha resolved to take the example of the Sadhu to heart, and leave the palace and seek answers to his questions of why there is poverty, old age, disease and death. He had to Go Forth – to find the Truth.

Siddhartha realised that he had to separate himself from the demands of the group of which he was a part – he had to go his own, individual way. He needed to get away from the roles he was expected to play and that he did not choose. He felt that he had caught a glimpse of something richer, of new possibilities and that his old life was holding him back.

Siddhartha realised that he literally had to leave home. He therefore leaves parents, wife, child, tribe – and he goes at night. Siddhartha steals away from the group, he just slips out, otherwise they won’t let him go.

Going Forth is about is starting to control and determine your own identity yourself, and not letting others do it for you. This is what “leaving the group means”.

What Does Going Forth Mean?

Everyone has set roles that they fit into. We have to act a certain way in the different groups we are in.

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In the family you function in a role, as son, daughter, mother, etc. The danger is that we over identify with a familial role as if this is just ALL you are, which is how families can become stifling. Often only when you have left home do you really relate to your parents as people, see them perhaps as fallible or funny, and have a much richer and perhaps more loving relationship with them.

Other groups that one may Go Forth from are your social scene, its fashions, its jargon, and its chitchat. Then you may go forth from an obsessive, unhealthy sexual or emotional relationship – one that is based on mutual emotional dependence and exploitation.

Then there is the Going Forth from the economic group and perhaps your job. There is the danger of over identifying with what you do. People ask, “What are you”…and you give them a job title, a role. You play or live a role.

Prince Siddhartha was raised a Hindu and had readily accepted the caste system. The caste system was a structure in society which was heavily related to the religious beliefs of reincarnation. It was strongly felt that actions in this life determined the life you would lead in the future – if you were evil and nasty you would be reincarnated into someone who suffered, if you were kind and good you were reincarnated into someone rich. This strong belief meant that many people felt you ‘deserved’ the life you had and that whilst you could still be kind to others there was no obligation to support the most vulnerable in society.

The Caste System

People were born into the caste system and then had to choose professions accepted within the caste system, which usually meant following your family’s jobs. You could not work your way through the castes, or marry someone from a different caste. If you broke the caste system you were rejected from society – you became an ‘out-caste’. This system had been heavily reinforced for thousands of years. (If you think about the different factions in Divergent with the factionless being like the Out-Caste)

caste-system-in-hinduism

The very bottom of the caste system was the ‘Untouchables’ to have any contact with this group immediately made you impure. You can see the broad strata in the image on the right.

Buddha was opposed to this structuring and said it was wrong to assign someone to a caste for their whole life. He said people should be judged on ‘merit’ (what they could do) rather than what they were born into. He changed his beliefs from his previous Hindu upbringing to something which was seen as completely radical for his time.

Buddha also believed that everyone could be on a path to enlightenment and could do things to improve their chances of achieving enlightenment, whereas Hinduism mainly left the religious roles to the Brahman’s, Buddha said everyone could find a spiritual path to enlightenment.

The Buddha also departed from Hindu beliefs about God. For the Buddha the aim of existence was to cease existing, to end suffering you had to end your own rebirths because you could never escape suffering.

Buddha believed there was no God which radically departed from Hindu beliefs. In Hinduism there was one God reflected in many other gods e.g. god of fertility, god of life, god of harvests etc. For the average Hindu householder they picked a god who would best serve them and built shrines to worship them, e.g. a farmer would choose the gods of rain, sunshine and fertility and worship them.

Buddha changed his life dramatically – from a wealthy prince ready to rule over a large empire established by his father to a wandering ascetic looking for truth. His previous life was full of luxury and material goods but his new life was austere and spiritual. With this change in circumstances there was a change in attitude and beliefs.

The 3 Dimensions of Going Forth

Going Forth’ can be broken down into three parts:

The Physical Journey. Prince Siddhartha physically leaves the palace, his life of luxury, his family, friends and the life he knows in search of something unknown. He rides out on his horse beyond the palace walls in search of truth.

The Emotional Break. Prince Siddhartha has to break his emotional ties to his family, his culture and his own identity. He must go forward independently and open his mind to new ideas and experiences.

The Psychological Shift: Prince Siddhartha has been awakened to a different reality and this changes the way he thinks. He wants to end suffering for all, he wants to find peace for himself, he has been challenged to think differently. He has had a culture-shock and he starts to question cultural values. So he goes in search of truth and an end to suffering.

Karma and Path to Enlightenment

Buddha’s idea of karma was also different. In Hinduism there was a linear approach to karma – a person would do something and immediately there was a consequence or an identifiable trace between cause and effect. However, Buddha saw Karma as much more complex and working in more challenging ways.

karma-do-good-and-goo-will-come-to-you-e-buddhism-7739980

Buddha also accepted many ideas prevalent in Hindu culture – encouragement to be vegetarian and not to harm other living beings, ideas about searching for truth by looking within, the practices of meditation and yoga and so on. So whilst he went forth and revolutionized some beliefs, he also stayed true to many cultural beliefs.

Buddha taught his followers in many different ways and encouraged them to find their own path to enlightenment. He used stories, teaching, meditation, self-denial and other methods to show that there were many paths towards enlightenment. This was different to the Hindu tradition which prescribed particular practices.

Let’s create a LearningRMPS community!

Let’s create a LearningRMPS community!

Welcome back to the new term!

It’s great to see so many new readers and followers. In 2017 alone, we have had 10,000 views from nearly 60 countries! Pretty Impressive! But I need your help!

Help Required!

I set up this site as a place to share further ideas, information and easy to access to resources for all RMPS pupils. I am a fan of Google Classroom and Glow and all the other sites you can use to share resources with pupils. I did just feel that if they didn’t require to log in and could access the information straight away it was easier for them to revise! It also means that RMPS students across the country could also benefit, I’m a massive advocate of sharing is caring and there is no point in reinventing the wheel!  Feel free to comment on pages you found useful and provide any further links to help with learning. Also if you have something you think would benefit the site, whether it be a summary of a topic, a great video linked to learning, a great revision aid or anything from your RME/RERC/RE/RMPS (delete as appropriate) classroom that you wouldn’t mind sharing to help the website grow please let me know! I don’t always get the chance to write up everything I wish I could!

What I am saying is feel free to comment on pages you found useful and provide any further links to help with learning. Also if you have something you think would benefit the site, whether it be a summary of a topic, a great video linked to learning, a great revision aid or anything from your RME/RERC/RE/RMPS (delete as appropriate) classroom that you wouldn’t mind sharing to help the website grow please let me know! I don’t always get the chance to write up everything I wish I could! I would love this website to be a community of RME teachers sharing their knowledge and helping others.

If you are interested in providing some content (it doesn’t have to be an immediate commitment or a commitment at all) I can be contacted on learningrmps@icloud.com

Have a Happy New School Term!

 

Mrs W _92439096_parentholdschildshand

The Life of Jesus – Revision Resource

The Life of Jesus – Revision Resource

This is a great website that talks you through all the things you need to know about Jesus.

In the National 5 and Higher Exam – you will need to know Who Jesus was, Beliefs about him, his teachings, what impact he had as well as basic information about his life.

You may be asked to reflect on who he was in relation to God. Also you should be able to describe a few parables in detail.

http://request.org.uk/jesus/introduction-to-jesus/

This Website  – REQuest is really easy to use and helpful at guiding you through Jesus’ life.

Why not use it to answer some of these questions.

  1. Create a timeline of key events in Jesus’ life.
  2. What is the significance of the Incarnation (Birth of Jesus) to Christians (4)
  3. What are Christian Beliefs about Jesus? (4)
  4. Explain what is meant by the Holy Trinity. (4)
  5. Jesus is often referred to as the Messiah – What does this mean? (4)
  6. Jesus taught people how to live by using parables.
    1. Summarise 2 parables and their meanings.
    2. Explain how Jesus used Parables to teach people how to live their lives (4)
  7. Summarise the Easter Story. (4)
  8. How do Christians celebrate this? (4)

The website also has lots of other information for revision. I will pinpoint some other parts.

Is God A Man In the Sky? – Huffington Post Article

Is God A Man In the Sky? – Huffington Post Article

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The Creation of Adam by Michelangelo at the Sistine chapel, Vatican city, Rome, Italy

Professor Alan Lurie writes about his beliefs on What God is. He is from a Jewish faith and this could be useful when asked in an exam or assignment about beliefs about God.

As a rabbi, I am often asked to define the word “God.” And as a person whose life is centred on knowing God, I’ve attempted to give thoughtful responses. But I’ve discovered that my attempts, which are given with the intention of reducing misunderstandings, usually produce the opposite results, and create more misunderstandings. This is because whatever one’s position — from atheistic to fundamentalist and all points in between — we all, as products of a culture steeped in religion, necessarily carry ideas about God, and many of these ideas can be held so stubbornly that any meaningful conversation is immediately derailed.

For many people, the word “God” just seems to ring badly. It feels stuffy, old-fashioned and self-righteousness — a relic from a less enlightened age. For others, the answer has already been given by the doctrine of their religion, and so the issue is closed. For others, the very notion of God is absurd, and so the issue is also closed.

Read the rest of the article here… 

Christian Beliefs about Nature of Humans

Christian Beliefs about Nature of Humans

In your exam you may be asked about The Nature of Human Beings. This is a revision guide for key ideas that you will need to know for your exam.

Created in the Image of God

So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. Genesis 1:27

What does this mean?

Christians believe that humans were made in the image of God. This means that they were created to resemble God’s spirit. This is also known as Imago Dei. This is what sets humans apart from animals. This is why Humans can communicate with God. By being created in God’s image this means that Christians believe they must act in a way that would please God.

Christians believe that God is all Loving and therefore they should act like that – read more here. 

Freewill

Christians believe that God gave all Humans Freewill. Freewill is the ability to make decisions for themselves. However Christians believe that God has planned everything in the Universe out. Some would argue this is incompatible with Freewill. However Christians would answer this by saying that they free to make their own choices but God will know what choice they will make.

Having freewill means that Humans are free to make decisions- Christians believe that everyone should be using their Freewill wisely. They should look to the Bible for guidance as to how to live their life as well as follow the example of Jesus. It impacts on a daily basis as they should be thinking about what would please God in each situation.

What is the Human Condition?

The Human Condition is used to explain the idea that because Original Sin is in the world the whole of humanity suffers. This can only be rectified if Humans live a life that would please God. e.g. in his image or likeness.

Read more about it here. 

 

 

Christian Beliefs about Creation

Christian Beliefs about Creation

Christians believe that God created the Universe. He chose to create it out of love for humanity. Some may argue that he created it because he wanted to be worshipped, therefore it was selfish his creation however Christians would debate this. They would argue that as God is Omnipotent he doesn’t need to be loved.

One of the main theme running through Christianity is the theme of Love. God is full of Love as we should all be.

For Christians it is not important how God created the Universe, as they believe that is beyond their own imagination and for them it doesn’t really matter. This is their faith.  There are different arguments for the compatibility of God and Science. Read about them here.  There are two versions of the Creation story in the book of Genesis.

Genesis 1

Genesis 1 is also known as the 7 Day creation story. This is the story that God created the Universe in 6 days and rested on the 7th.

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Genesis 2

Genesis 2 is the story of Adam and Eve. Where God created humans first and placed them in a Garden. This provides an account of how sin entered the world

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Creationist Christians

There are different types of Creationist Christians (You can read about this in more depth here) In general they believe that the story in the Bible is the literal truth.

Liberal Christians

Liberal Christians take these as stories or parables. Stories that help tell a more complex idea. This is how many Christians would then link in these ideas with Scientific Theories like the Big Bang Theory and Evolution. 

This links with the Philosophical ideas of Telelogical and Cosmological ideas.

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See this table for different interpretations of the Genesis stories.

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What is Reality? Philosophy and Film – Descartes

What is Reality? Philosophy and Film – Descartes

Our S3 Pupils are embarking on a Unit looking at different philosophical ideas. Firstly we are starting with some Epistemology, this is the study of knowledge.

We began by thinking about what is knowledge and reality. Do we ever really know anything? How can we trust what we know? This led to some great conversations on things  we thought we knew but actually turned out to be false. For example people believing the world was flat and some people who still believe this to be true.

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We then looked at some optical illusions and discussed how our senses can deceive us.

This led us to discuss the work of Rene Descartes. Descartes argued that because our senses have tricked us before it cannot be guaranteed that they would not trick us again. Descartes argued whether it was possible to truly know anything. His conclusion was that the only thing that we could truly know is that we exist. We don’t know if we are being controlled, like a Sim or whether we are dreaming we are humans. This is quite a difficult concept to comprehend. Therefore we are watching the film, The Truman Show to apply this knowledge of Descartes to the concept of reality.

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National 5 Revision Guides and Questions

National 5 Revision Guides and Questions

Hello National 5s

Below are the revision guides for your three units to complete in the exam.

I will add more and more revision guides to this website for the topics that you need to know about for the exam.

Remember to use this website to help or come along to B12 after school for help.

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Use these Revision Questions to help test your knowledge of the above content. There are revision guides on this page for most of the topics if you need extra help.

National 5- Revision Questions